NOAA explains why geomagnetic storm won't hit Earth on March 18

NOAA explains why geomagnetic storm won't hit Earth on March 18

NOAA explains why geomagnetic storm won't hit Earth on March 18

After several media outlets wrote about a massive geomagnetic storm that could hit Earth on March 18, it spread across the internet like wildfire. While the idea of a massive solar storm hurtling toward Earth at thousands of miles per second sounds scary, there's really no need to worry.

A picture of a solar flare from 2011 and a CMEWhat is a solar storm?

In fact, NOAA admits that a geomagnetic storm will hit the Earth on March 18th but this one will not even reach the G1 magnitude, therefore, it can't affect the satellites, the Global Positioning System equipment, or other communication means, as the Russians informed.

Instead, the storm that will take place on March 18 is just a feeble solar storm which is classified as a G1 category and will not harm any electrical types of equipment at all.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) refuted reports that a substantial storm will disrupt telecommunication systems over the weekend.

A temporary disturbance of the Earth's magnetosphere, a geomagnetic storm is the result of a solar wind shock wave and/or a cloud of magnetic field, causing an increase in plasma movement and electric current through the magnetosphere.

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Apparently, NOAA has no idea what is this all about as and how did Russians come up with that information.

Usually, geomagnetic storms are cataloged in 5 different main levels depending on the magnitude, from G1 to G5 levels of geomagnetic storms' magnitudes.

A geomagnetic solar storm is expected to hit Earth in the next couple of days, allowing the auroras to be seen from Australia.

And if you're far enough north, or perhaps in Antarctica (hi there!), you may get to feast your eyes on the aurora as the charged particles channelled towards the poles by Earth's magnetic field interact with the ionosphere. This basically means there could be some slight glitches to satellite communications and power grid controllers.

The dancing lights of the aurora may become visible in parts of Scotland and northern England and in northern regions of the US, including in MI and Maine. One storm occurred in 1859, while the latter occurred in 1989, which resulted in a nine-hour blackout in Canada.

The Northern Lights is a natural display in the earth's sky, which are predominantly normally seen in high-latitude regions such as around the Arctic and Antarctic.

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