British government apologises for treatment of 'Windrush generation' of migrants

Britain's Prince Harry right and Prime Minister Theresa May attend a Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting Youth Forum in London Monday

Britain's Prince Harry right and Prime Minister Theresa May attend a Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting Youth Forum in London Monday

Speaking to ITV News about the mistakes made in cases involving the Windrush generation facing deportation from the United Kingdom, immigration minister Caroline Nokes said: "There have been some horrendous situations that as a minister have appalled me".

"The government must immediately guarantee that anyone who comes forward to clarify their status should not face deportation or detention, because as things stand today there are thousands of people who are too anxious about their future to come forward".

British media have reported cases such as a man who was denied treatment for cancer and a special needs teaching assistant who lost his job after being accused of being illegal immigrants despite living in Britain for more than 40 years.

"I do not want of any of the Commonwealth citizens who are here legally to be impacted in the way they have and, frankly, some of the way they have been treated has been wrong, has been appalling, and I am sorry", Ms Rudd told parliament.

After initially rejecting their request for a meeting, a Downing Street U-turn will now see the Prime Minister meet with Caribbean leaders in a bid to ease the controversy.

Many long-term immigrants who arrived from the Commonwealth as children have been told they are here illegally.

The Home Office said delegates at this week's Commonwealth heads of government meeting in London will be able to speak to Mrs May about the situation.

"I don't know the numbers, but what I am determined to do going forward is to say we will have no more of this".

The Home Office earlier confirmed the meeting was requested but the subject of the proposed meeting was not made clear.

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"That's why I am setting up a new area in my department to ensure that we have a completely new approach to how their situation is regularised".

People born in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries are thought to be more affected than those from other Commonwealth nations, as they were more likely to arrive on their parent's passports without their own ID documents.

It was signed by 140 MPs including Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Conservative MP Sarah Wollaston.

The letter to Mrs May calls for action over the immigration anomalies, stating: "All too often these routine bureaucratic errors bring about the separation of families and irreparable damage to lives in addition to undue stress, anxiety and suffering".

Many are now being denied access to health services, prevented from working and in some cases are being threatened with deportation.

"There have been some horrendous situations which as a minister have appalled me", the immigration minister told ITV News in response to a question about deportations.

It said: "We urge you to guarantee the status of all Commonwealth nationals whose right to remain is protected by law and to provide an effective, humane route to the clarification of their status".

Barbados high commissioner to the UK, Guy Hewitt, claimed he had initially been told the Prime Minister's schedule was "full" this week. These individuals have done nothing wrong and there is no basis upon which the Home Office can justify what they are doing.

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