Thousands gather to remember victims of Manchester attack

The last time her mother saw Nell was in the car park of her school as she ran off to get read to go to the show with her friend Freya

The last time her mother saw Nell was in the car park of her school as she ran off to get read to go to the show with her friend Freya

Thousands of people gathered in England on Tuesday to mark the one-year anniversary of the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing.

Among the dignitaries present were the Duke of Cambridge, Prime Minister Theresa May, Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon, Lib Dem leader Sir Vince Cable, Greater Manchester Chief Constable Ian Hopkins, Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham and Sir Richard Leese, the leader of Manchester City Council. This day will be hard for you all, but know this - you are not alone, Manchester stands with you.

Those working on building sites across Manchester city centre found a unique way to observe today's one minute silence.

"The targeting of the young and innocent as they enjoyed a carefree night out. was an act of sickening cowardice", Theresa May wrote in the city's local paper the Manchester Evening News.

They included the Manchester Survivors Choir, made up of people who were at the arena on the night of the fateful concert last May 22, and Parrs Wood High School's Harmony Group, whose post-attack tribute went viral previous year.

"It was created to strike at the heart of our values and our way of life in one of our most vibrant cities, with the aim of breaking our resolve and dividing us. I love you with all of me and am sending you all of the light and warmth I have to offer on this challenging day", she wrote along with a worker bee emoticon which is widely used to represent the city as a symbol of industry.

He also told the crowd that the 22 candles lit in tribute to the victims at Manchester Cathedral had been made from the remnants of the hundreds left around the city in the aftermath of the attack.

A year on the heartbroken mother admitted she and her family would never get over her death and would have to learn to live with the grief
A year on the heartbroken mother admitted she and her family would never get over her death and would have to learn to live with the grief

Nine-year-old Molly said she was taking part because it was "a good thing to do for all the people who can't be here", while Matty, 14, said the unity in singing "is what Manchester's all about". "Never Forget. Forever Manchester".

Salman Abedi, a British man of Libyan heritage, blew himself up outside the venue, in the northern English city, and an investigation continues into how the attack happened.

Police say 100 investigators are still working on the case.

Assistant Chief Constable Russ Jackson said: "The events of May 22 will forever be etched into the history of Manchester". It was the deadliest terrorist attack in Britain since the July 2005 London bombings.

Later, thousands of people - including a choir of survivors - are due to gather for a concert and sing-song in St. Ann's Square.

Bells will ring out across the city center at 10:31 p.m.to mark the exact moment of the explosion a year ago.

"That is the hope that the Trees of Hope trail will symbolise".

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