Two suspected cases of Nipah virus reported from a second Indian state

Nipah Virus Kills One More in Kerala Public Meetings Banned

Nipah Virus Kills One More in Kerala Public Meetings Banned

Although state health officials in Kerala - a popular travel destination for Gulf tourists - have declared the state safe, they have cautioned travellers against visiting the districts of Kozhikode, Malappura, Waynad and Kannur.

Medical personnel wearing protective suits check patients at the Medical College hospital in Kozhikode, Kerala state, India, May 21, 2018 amid a deadly outbreak of the Nipah virus, carried mainly by fruit bats. Here are some common signs and symptoms of NiV infection.

At least eight people who have had contact with the sick are being kept in isolation, in their homes, so their conditions can be monitored, officials say.

The UAE Consulate of Kerala in Thiruvananthapuram has issued a warning on its official Twitter handle regarding the recent Nipah virus outbreak.

The first fatal cases in Kerala were reported on Saturday from a family in Kozhikode, as two brothers in their late 20s and their 50-year-old aunt died from the virus.

Infectious disease outbreaks can be a challenge in India, the world's second most populous country, where infection control and surveillance systems are weak, leading to hundreds of deaths annually from diseases such as mosquito-borne dengue.

The patients are being treated and samples of their blood have been sent for screening, with results expected by Thursday, he added.

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According to CDC, avoiding exposure to sick bats and pigs in areas where the infection is already prevalent and not drinking raw date palm sap may be the initial precautions. The symptoms include fever and headaches, followed by drowsiness and confusion, leading to possible coma and death within a week.

Who are at high risk of getting infected with Nipah virus? . "And we want to make sure that it stays contained here", said R.L. Sarita, the director of health services in Kerala.

The natural host of the virus are fruit bats.

Medics wearing protective gear examine a patient at a hospital in Kozhikode in the southern state of Kerala, India May 21, 2018.

As in the case of the first outbreak in 1998, bats may pass the virus to other animals and livestock, which can then pass it on to humans. Eating food which may have the droplets of saliva of infected bats can lead to the transmission of the virus.

There is now no vaccine or treatment to tackle Nipah, which has a mortality rate of around 70 percent.

There is no vaccine and thereby supportive care is the only way.

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