Catch The Best of This Year's Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend

Perseid Meteor Shower 2018

Perseid Meteor Shower 2018

With some luck, you should be able to catch a glimpse of the shooting stars yourself.

Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the almost full moon obscuring the Perseid meteor shower a year ago will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month.

Forecasters expect the peak to occur the nights of August 11 and 12.

The Perseids are a result of the Earth's orbit, when it travels through the cloud of debris caused by the comet Swift-Tuttle.

"This year the moon will be near new moon, it will be a crescent, which means it will set before the Perseid show gets underway after midnight", NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke told Space.com. In those cases they can actually predict that when the Earth passes through the orbital path of the comet there will be a higher than average debris field. "Most particles are about the size of a small rock or beach sand, and they weigh just about 1-2 grams (roughly the same as a paperclip)". The August shower gets its name from the constellation Perseus because the meteors appear to originate there. But for those who want to experience the meteor shower amped up to 11, getting to a "dark sky park" is an absolute must.

The ideal time for meteor-spotting is when the sky is at its darkest; between 1am and the onset of dawn twilight.

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The Mleiha Archaeological and Eco-tourism Project in Sharjah has geared up its preparation for the Perseid Meteor Shower, scheduled to light the UAE skies on Sunday from 8pm to 1am.

Although, stargazers in mid-northern latitudes will be privy to the best views, according to NASA, anyone can see the light show.

What do I need to see them?

Go there and give your eyes 15 minutes to adjust to the darkness.

Patience is also a virtue, with shooting stars tending to appear in clusters, followed by a lull.

Every 133 years or so, the massive Swift-Tuttle comet careens through our solar system at 150 times the speed of sound, spreading a dirty trail of ice, dust and sundry space schmutz behind it.

A cloudy night could still scupper your chances of spotting any meteors, however, so keep your eye on weather forecasts.

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