Paul Manafort’s defense rests without calling a single witness

Prosecution rests case against Paul Manafort

Prosecution rests case against Paul Manafort

Prosecutors rested their case Monday afternoon in the trial against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Gates testified last week that Manafort, his former boss, directed him to help commit the tax and bank frauds, but the defence portrayed him as living a "secret life" of infidelity and embezzlement. Defence attorneys have called Gates a liar, philanderer and embezzler as they've sought to undermine his testimony.

Lawyers for the two sides are expected to deliver their closing arguments on Wednesday, meaning the high-profile criminal case - the first trial on charges brought by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III - could quickly reach the jury and a verdict.

Your opinion matters. Take Market Connections' survey about how you consume media. Manafort, Donald Trump's campaign manager in 2016, got a quick response. Gates struck a plea deal with prosecutors and provided much of the drama of the trial so far.

The government says Manafort hid around $16 million in income from the IRS between 2010 and 2014 by disguising money he earned advising politicians in Ukraine as loans and hiding it in foreign banks.

Brennan also testified that bank employees discovered that Manafort had loans on two other properties but did not know which properties they were associated with. During testimony, Gates was also forced to admit embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars from Manafort and conducting an extramarital affair. Asked by U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III whether he wished to testify in his defense, Manafort responded: "No, sir". The admittedly impatient judge has pushed the government to speed up its case.

A bank executive said he found several red flags with Paul Manafort's finances while the former Trump campaign chairman was being considered for $16.5 million in bank loans.

James Brennan, a vice-president at Federal Savings Bank, said Manafort failed to disclose mortgages on his loan application. He says he also found several "inconsistencies" in the amount of income Manafort reported for his business. Brennan even rated one loan for Manafort risky but doable in a memorandum used by regulators and the bank.

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The loans were approved, Brennan told a federal court jury, "because Mr. Calk wanted it to close".

But the defense team thinks it has an extra leg up on dismissing the four Federal Savings Bank fraud charges because Ellis previously suggested in court that the bank couldn't be defrauded if Calk wanted Manafort to have the loans.

Last week, jurors heard testimony that Calk approved the loans as he sought Manafort's help in getting a high-ranking position in the Trump administration.

"The 3 individuals are people who I believe advance DT agenda". "His background is strong in defense issues, management and finance".

And three days after Trump defeated Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president in November 2016, Calk called Raico asking him to check in with Manafort to see if Calk was a candidate for the Treasury or Housing and Urban Development posts.

Gates, Manafort's right-hand man, was the government's star witness, while Manafort's lawyers have put attacking his credibility at the heart of their defense.

A Chicago-based bank lost $11.8 million because it had to write off a significant portion of two loans it made to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort. The case against Manafort has long centered on whether he lied when he claimed not to control any foreign bank accounts.

By that time, according to investigators, the millions of dollars Manafort had been making every year as a political consultant in Ukraine had dried up.

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