Jamal Khashoggi: What we know about journalist’s disappearance

Turkish paper publishes photos of Saudi journalist's 'assassination squad'

Turkish paper publishes photos of Saudi journalist's 'assassination squad'

Riyadh has said Khashoggi left the consulate after his visit.

A Turkish security source had previously told Reuters that a group of 15 Saudi nationals, including some officials, arrived in Istanbul and entered the consulate on October 2, the same day Khashoggi was there, and later left the country. Turkish officials have alleged he was killed in the compound while Saudis officials said he left the building unharmed. She said the writer first visited the consulate on September 28 "despite being somewhat concerned that he could be in danger".

A private Turkish television channel close to the country's president has aired surveillance video of missing writer Jamal Khashoggi walking into the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul and a black van leaving later for the consul's home.

A tweet by Saud Al-Qahtani, an adviser to the Royal Court of Saudi Arabia who is close to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, threatening to kill the opposition even if they hide under the Kaaba curtain has been widely condemned.

Sabah daily on Wednesday published the names and images of what it called the "assassination team" including a man called Salah Muhammed Al-Tubaigy whose name it said matched that of a lieutenant-colonel in the Saudi forensic department.

The kingdom did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday. The channel said the van then drove some 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) to the consul's home, where it parked inside a garage.

Signs of such a challenge began to emerge Monday night when Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called on the Saudis to "support a thorough investigation of Mr. Khashoggi's disappearance and to be transparent about the results of that investigation".

Officials also say they had become aware that Khashoggi may have been kidnapped before the second plane had departed, and monitored seven Saudis in a waiting room as they checked their luggage for a second time. He later returned October 2 after being promised needed paperwork so the two could be married.

A human rights activist holds picture of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a protest outside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey October 9, 2018.

More news: Jamaal Charles To Jaguars: Fantasy Impact Of Running Back’s Signing
More news: ‘Embarrassing’: Yanks routed by Red Sox 16-1, trail ALDS 2-1
More news: CrossFit fundraising for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Foxborough

Khashoggi, who wrote critically for the Post about Prince Mohammed's rise to power, also sought to become a USA citizen, Cengiz wrote.

A week after the disappearance of Saudi dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi, details about what happened to him at the Saudi consulate are beginning to emerge, along with indications that the USA had information of a Saudi plot against him.

"At this time, I implore President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump to help shed light on Jamal's disappearance", she said. "I also urge Saudi Arabia, especially King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to show the same level of sensitivity and release CCTV footage from the consulate". Saudi Arabia insists that he left the consulate shortly after he arrived.

Trump, who took his first overseas trip as US president to the kingdom and whose son-in-law Jared Kushner has close ties to Prince Mohammed, said while he had not yet talked to the Saudis about Khashoggi.

Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Hami Aksoy said Tuesday that Saudi authorities have notified Ankara that they were "open to cooperation" and would allow the consulate building to be searched.

The search will take place as part of the official investigation, which was being conducted "in an intense manner", he said without giving any date.

The Post elaborated on those accounts in a separate story Tuesday, writing that the Saudi team laid in wait for Khashoggi to enter the consulate.

Embassies and consulates under the Vienna Convention are technically foreign soil and must be protected by host nations.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.