A 360 degree bowling action!

The incident occured on on day three of a CK Nayudu Trophy match between Bengal and Uttar Pradesh in Kalyania near Kolkata where UP’s left-arm spinner Shiva Singh sent social media into meltdown

The incident occured on on day three of a CK Nayudu Trophy match between Bengal and Uttar Pradesh in Kalyania near Kolkata where UP’s left-arm spinner Shiva Singh sent social media into meltdown

However, some fans were left scratching their heads over the exact rule and whether or not Shiva Singh's delivery was fair or not.

Uttar Pradesh's left-arm spinner Shiva Singh is making the headlines for his 360-degree turn just prior to delivery.

Singh questioned the umpire's call, but after a discussion with his fellow umpire Ravi Shankar, Seshan reportedly told the Uttar Pradesh team's captain Shivam Chaudhary that any further deliveries like the first one would also be called a dead ball.

"I delivered this 360-degree ball against Kerala in the Vijay Hazare Trophy as well, where it was fine".

Shiva Singh's freaky delivery was called a dead ball by the umpire and has caused plenty of debate in the cricketing world as to whether it should have been a legal delivery or not.

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As per section 4 of Law 42 (Fair and Unfair Play), "It is unfair for any fielder deliberately to attempt to distract the striker while he is preparing to receive or receiving a delivery".

However, his delivery was called a dead ball by the onfield umpire. Batsman always go for the reverse-sweep or the switch-hit against bowlers.

Former spinner Bishan Bedi - another slow left-arm orthodox bowler, who took 266 Test wickets for India in the 1960s and 1970s - was succinct in summing up Singh's performance, tweeting "Weirdo.!". "But when bowlers do something like this it's deemed a dead ball".

"The law states that the offence is the attempt to distract the batsman, rather than the striker actually being distracted". The procedure in Law 41.4 also includes the awarding of five penalty runs.

The MCC cited the example of England pacer Stuart Broad, who received a warning from the match referee during a match against South Africa in 2009 for pointing at the cover fielder during his run-up, as it was felt to be a distraction tactic.

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