These diets and supplements may not really protect the heart

Researchers Are Giving An Opinion For The Supplements That Is Not Helping Your Heart

Researchers Are Giving An Opinion For The Supplements That Is Not Helping Your Heart

A similar conclusion applies to low-fat diets.

The researchers found that only a handful of the dietary supplements along with just one of the eight dietary interventions had some protective benefits against heart diseases.

"The reason we conducted this study was that millions of people in the United States and across the world consume supplements or follow certain dietary patterns, but there was no good-quality evidence to suggest that these interventions have any effect on cardiovascular protection".

"This analysis further reveals that despite in-depth sales and use of various dietary supplements, there's a lack of scientific proof supporting the usage of many dietary supplements", stated Dr. Bruce Y. Lee, an affiliate professor of global health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who was not concerned with the analysis.

But, calcium plus vitamin d intake was linked to an increased risk for stroke.

The research paper has been disclosed in the Annals of Internal Medicine with the title as "Effects of Nutritional Supplements and Dietary Interventions on Cardiovascular Outcomes: An Umbrella Review and Evidence Map", which was directed by researchers at West Virginia University School of Medicine in the U.S.

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"This research further exhibits that regardless of extensive sales and use of different dietary supplements, there's a lack of scientific proof supporting the usage of many supplements", mentioned Dr. Bruce Y. Lee, an associate professor of worldwide health on the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who was not concerned within the analysis.

You may be taking dietary supplements that have no added health benefits. Reduced salt intake, omega-3 LC-PUFA use, and folate supplementation could reduce risk for some cardiovascular outcomes in adults. People with hypertension are already at risk for various cardiovascular events. "Similarly, the totality of evidence is not consistent for the efficacy of reduced saturated fats".

Satjit Bhusri, MD, a cardiologist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, argues that "more powerful, diet specific trials" have demonstrated heart-protective gains from the Mediterranean diet. Because these records depend on patient memories and estimates, they can often be inaccurate. The analysis included randomized controlled data from two new trials: the Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial (VITAL) and the Vitamin D Assessment Study (VIDA).

"Unfortunately, the current study leaves us with the same foggy conditions that we started with", write the authors of an accompanying editorial. "Until these conditions clear, it would be reasonable to hold off on any supplement or diet modification in all guidelines and recommendations".

"People should focus on healthy diet from nutritional food sources - not vitamins or supplements - in combination with a healthy lifestyle that includes regular physical activity and not smoking", he says.

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